THE RIGHTS TO ADEQUATE HOUSING Part 1-Fact sheets No 21 UN Habitat

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THE RIGHTS TO ADEQUATE HOUSING Part 1-Fact sheets No 21 UN Habitat

Good afternoon friends!

We are starting to publish a series of materials on the right to adequate housing (RAH).  In our publications, you will find out: What does housing adequacy mean?Which groups are the most vulnerable? What are the state's obligations to guarantee and protect (RAH)?

As well as national and international mechanisms for the protection of human rights.

The first part is devoted to an explanation of what means adequate housing, which includes the concept of adequacy.

 In order for housing to be adequate, it must at least meet the following criteria:

Adequate housing must provide more than four walls and a roof. A number of conditions must be met before particular forms of shelter can be considered to constitute “adequate housing.” These elements are just as fundamental as the basic supply and availability of housing. For housing to be adequate, it must, at a minimum, meet the following criteria:

General comments are adopted by the treaty bodies based on their monitoring experience. They offer expert guidance to States on their obligations arising under a particular treaty.

Security of tenure: housing is not adequate if its occupants do not have a degree of tenure security which guarantees legal protection against forced evictions, harassment and other threats.

Availability of services, materials, facilities and infrastructure: housing is not adequate if its occupants do not have safe drinking water, adequate sanitation, energy for cooking, heating, lighting, food storage or refuse disposal.

Affordability: housing is not adequate if its cost threatens or compromises the occupants’ enjoyment of other human rights.

Habitability: housing is not adequate if it does not guarantee physical safety or provide adequate space, as well as protection against the cold, damp, heat, rain, wind, other threats to health and structural hazards.

Accessibility: housing is not adequate if the specific needs of disadvantaged and marginalized groups are not taken into account.

 

Location: housing is not adequate if it is cut off from employment opportunities, health-care services, schools, childcare centres and other social facilities, or if located in polluted or dangerous areas.

Cultural adequacy: housing is not adequate if it does not respect and take into account the expression of cultural identity.

English